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Posts Tagged ‘Fasching’

Carnival Pack 2

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012

“Carnival Pack 2” is a collection of 4 transcripts, each in their own PDF file. The pack is a ZIP file containing the 4 PDFs and is available from the AllThingsGerman Download Store.

The transcripts in this pack are:

To find out more, visit the AllThingsGerman Download Store.

 



Carnival Pack 1

Saturday, February 6th, 2010

“Carnival Pack 1” is a collection of 4 transcripts, each in their own PDF file.  The pack is a ZIP file containing the 4 PDFs and is available from the AllThingsGerman Download Store.

The transcripts in this pack are:

To find out more, visit the AllThingsGerman Download Store.



Karneval – Fasching – Fastnacht

Wednesday, February 13th, 2008

Karneval, also known as Fasching or Fastnacht (even Fasnet, Fasnacht or Fasenacht), officially begins on 11th November at 11:11, but it only really gets going after Ephiphany.

However the really mad days only start on the Thursday before Rosenmontag, when the main events such as the processions take place.

This Thursday is also known as the Weiberfastnacht – on this day the women celebrate. (A word of warning to all men: don’t wear a tie to work on this day!)

The season is the last chance to drink and be merry before the start of Lent, and it is also to drive out the darkness of the winter.

To hear a simple explanation and a short discussion in German, listen to the podcast:

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Rosenmontag

Wednesday, February 6th, 2008

Rosenmontag is the last Monday before Lent. In the main areas where Karneval or Fasching is celebrated, there are parades on this day and many companies give their employees the day off.

There are different stories as to how the unusual name came about. One says that it developed from Rasenden Montag, because everything is so mad on that day. Another says that it is the day after Rosensonntag, the day on which the Pope used to give someone a golden rose.

Traditionally people eat Berliner on this day – a jam-filled doughnut.

To hear a simple explanation and a short discussion in German, listen to the podcast:

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