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Posts Tagged ‘Lebkuchen’

Christmas Pack 1

Sunday, December 19th, 2010

“Christmas Pack 1” is a collection of 13 transcripts, each in their own PDF file. The pack is a ZIP file containing the 13 PDFs and is available from the AllThingsGerman Download Store.

The transcripts in this pack are:

To find out more, visit the AllThingsGerman Download Store.



Dominosteine

Wednesday, December 3rd, 2008

DominosteineThe word Dominostein is used to describe a small baked sweet that is eaten at Christmas time in Germany.  It is made up of two or three layers, the base being Lebkuchen, the middle fruit jelly, and the top layer marzipan or persipan.  This is then covered in a thin chocolate coating.

Dominosteine are a relatively recent invention.  They were created in Dresden in 1936 and were popular during the Second World War as a form of sweet due to the small amounts of ingredients needed to make them.

To hear a simple explanation and a short discussion in German, listen to the podcast:

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Lebkuchen

Friday, December 7th, 2007

Throughout December we will be publishing two German Words Explained podcasts each week. The extra podcasts will appear on the 7th, 14th, 21st, 24th and 31st.

LebkuchenherzenLebkuchen is a type of cake associated with Christmas. It is baked using honey and a number of spices and is known throughout Germany by a variety of names such as Pfefferkuchen and Magenbrot.

There are filled and unfilled versions, some covered in chocolate. It tastes similar to gingerbread.

To hear a simple explanation and a short discussion in German, listen to the podcast:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

(Press the “play” button to listen to the podcast)

Download a transcript

Download the MP3 file | Subscribe to the podcast



 

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